Remembering Oklahoma City 1995

 

25th Anniversary Oklahoma City Remembrance Ceremony

WE WILL NEVER FORGET!!!!!

The Dillon Foundation continues to honor and remember financially, spiritually and emotionally all the men and women, mothers and children, born and unborn, who were lost at 9:02 a.m. on April 19, 1995.

Sunday April 19th, 2020 marked the twenty-fifth anniversary of the horrific Oklahoma City Bombing.

Coronavirus restrictions forced the cancelation of the ceremony at the site of the tragedy. Instead, the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum held a virtual Remembrance Ceremony in honor of those who were lost that day that included the reading of the names of the 168 victims.

The commemoration also featured 168 seconds of silence.

You can watch the full video of the 25th Remembrance Ceremony below.
 

25th Anniversary Remembrance Ceremony

Source: Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum
 

Testimonial

Good morning Jim,

You have been faithful to remember your oklahoma friends over 25 years with your kind and thoughtful spirit along with your generosity to the new YMCA child care facility. We will always appreciate you!!!

Stay save and healthy as we go thru this current health crisis.
May God bless you,
Mary Fallin (Former Governor 2011-2019)
 

Reflections: 25th Anniversary of the OKC Bombing

Educators, religious leaders and public officials reflect on the 25th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing in the video below.

Source: The Oklahoman

 

24th Anniversary Oklahoma City Remembrance

Friday, April 19th, 2019 marked the twenty-fourth anniversary of the horrific Oklahoma City Bombing.

The Dillon Foundation continues to honor and remember financially, spiritually and emotionally all the men and women, mothers and children, born and unborn, who were lost at 9:02 a.m. on April 19, 1995.

WE WILL NEVER FORGET!!!!!

Oklahoma City 24nd Anniversary

 

Oklahoma City 24nd Anniversary

 

Oklahoma City 24nd Anniversary

24 years ago, Oklahoma City suffered the deadliest domestic terrorist attack in United States history. What initially felt to be an insurmountable time of grief was alleviated by Oklahoma's public servants, private citizens and a national outpouring of support.

We remember those who were killed, those who survived and those changed forever in the 24th Annual Remembrance Ceremony.

We Remember Oklahoma City

Source: oklahomacitynationalmemorial.org

Togetherness Brings Remembrance and Joy.
The memory of Susie Ferrell is kept alive by the love of a very close family. A family that celebrates the joys of life whenever they get together.
Source: Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum

 

23rd Anniversary Oklahoma City Remembrance Ceremony

The Dillon Foundation continues to honor and remember financially, spiritually and emotionally all the men and women, mothers and children, born and unborn, who were lost at 9:02 a.m. on April 19, 1995.

WE WILL NEVER FORGET!!!!!

Thursday April 19th, 2018 marked the twenty-third anniversary of the horrific Oklahoma City Bombing. The Dillon Foundation sent this wreath to be placed on one of the chairs at the Memorial. Each chair represents one of the individuals that were killed. The smaller chairs are for the children. There were 19 children killed.

Starting at 7 a.m., staff at the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum placed a single rose on the 168 chairs in the memorial.

The ceremony featured 168 seconds of silence to honor the victims and the reading of each of their names, floor by floor.

Oklahoma City 23nd Anniversary

You can view this year ceremony at the following link:
http://okcfox.com/news/local/we-remember-23-years-since-the-oklahoma-city-bombing

 

22nd Anniversary Oklahoma City Remembrance Ceremony

The Dillon Foundation continues to honor and remember financially, spiritually and emotionally all the men and women, mothers and children, born and unborn, who were lost at 9:02 a.m. on April 19, 1995.

WE MUST NOT FORGET!

As in years past, 168 seconds of silence were observed at 9:02 a.m. remembering those who were lost, followed by a program of hope and healing to honor the victims, survivors, rescuers, and all who were affected by the Oklahoma City bombing.

Oklahoma City 22nd Anniversary

 

Oklahoma City 22nd Anniversary

 

Oklahoma City 22nd Anniversary

 

Oklahoma City 22nd Anniversary

 

YMCA Testimonials

Oklahoma City YMCA Testimonial

 

Oklahoma City YMCA Testimonial

 

20th Anniversary Oklahoma City Remembrance Ceremony

The Dillon Foundation was in Oklahoma City on April 20th, 2015 to honor and remembers all the men and women, mothers and children, born and unborn, who were lost at 9:02 a.m. on April 19, 1995.

Oklahoma State Governor, Mary Fallin was joined by former President Bill Clinton, the director of the FBI, many Oklahoma officials and nearly a thousand others to mark the 20th anniversary of the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building that killed 168 people.

As in years past, 168 seconds of silence were observed at 9:02 a.m. remembering those who were lost, followed by a program of hope and healing to honor the victims, survivors, rescuers, and all who were affected by the Oklahoma City bombing.

 

Oklahoma City

President Clinton speaks at the 20th Anniversary Remembrance Ceremony

Oklahoma City

Governor Mary Fallin speaks at the 20th Anniversary Remembrance Ceremony

 

The Gates of Time

Monumental twin bronze gates frame the moment of destruction - 9:02 - and mark the formal entrances to the Outdoor Memorial. 9:01, found on the eastern gate, represents the last moments of peace, while its opposite on the western gate, 9:03, represents the first moments of recovery. Both time stamps are inscribed on the interior of the monument, facing each other and the Reflecting Pool.

The outside of each gate bears this inscription:

"We come here to remember Those who were killed, those who survived and those changed forever. May all who leave here know the impact of violence. May this memorial offer comfort, strength, peace, hope and serenity."

The Reflecting Pool

A thin layer of water flows over polished black granite to form the pool, which runs east to west down the center of the Memorial (also see reflecting pool) on what was once Fifth Street. Although the pool is flowing, visitors are able to see a mirror image of themselves in the water. Visitors seeing their reflections are said to be seeing "someone changed forever by what happened here."

Oklahoma City

The Gates of Time - Western Gate at Night

Oklahoma City

Western Gate - The Reflecting Pool - The Field of Empty Chairs

Oklahoma City

The Gates of Time - Western Gate

 

The Survivor Tree

An American elm on the north side of the Memorial, this was the only shade tree in the parking lot across the street from the Murrah Building. Commuters arrived early to get one of the shady parking spots provided by its branches. Photos of Oklahoma City taken in the 1920s show the tree to be about 100 years old.[6] The tree was taken for granted prior to the blast. Heavily damaged by the bomb, the tree survived after nearly being chopped down during the initial investigation, when workers wanted to recover evidence hanging in its branches and embedded in its bark.

The force of the blast ripped most of the branches from the Survivor Tree, glass and debris were embedded in its trunk and fire from the cars parked beneath it blackened what was left. Most thought the tree could not survive. Almost a year after the bombing, family members, survivors and rescue workers gathered for a memorial ceremony by the tree noticed it was beginning to bloom again. The Survivor Tree now thrives, and the Outdoor Memorial design includes a mandate to feature and protect the tree. For example, one of the roots that would have been cut by the wall surrounding the tree was placed inside a large pipe, so it could reach the soil beyond the wall without being damaged. The decking around the tree was raised several feet to make an underground crawlspace; workers enter through a secure hatchway and monitor the health of the tree and maintain its very deep roots.

The inscription around the inside of the deck wall around the Survivor Tree reads:

The spirit of this city and this nation will not be defeated; our deeply rooted faith sustains us.

Hundreds of seeds from the Survivor Tree are planted annually and the resulting saplings are distributed each year on the anniversary of the bombing. Thousands of Survivor Trees are growing in public and private places all over the United States

Oklahoma City

The Survivor Tree at night

Oklahoma City

The survivor Tree

 

Field of Empty Chairs

168 empty chairs hand-crafted from glass, bronze, and stone represent those who lost their lives, with a name etched in the glass base of each. They sit on the site where the Murrah Building once stood. The chairs represent the empty chairs at the dinner tables of the victims' families. The chairs are arranged in nine rows to symbolize the nine floors of the building; each person's chair is on the row (or the floor) on which the person worked or was located when the bomb went off. The chairs are also grouped according to the blast pattern, with the most chairs nearest the most heavily damaged portion of the building. The westernmost column of five chairs represents the five people who died but were not in the Murrah Building (two in the Water Resources Board building, one in the Athenian Building, one outside near the building, and one rescuer). The 19 smaller chairs represent the children killed in the bombing. Three unborn children died along with their mothers, and they are listed on their mothers' chairs beneath their mothers' names.

Oklahoma City

The Field of Empty Chairs at Night by the Reflecting Pool

Oklahoma City

The Field of Empty Chairs

Oklahoma City

The Field of Empty Chairs "Always Missed But Never Forgotten"

 

Journal Record Building

North of the memorial is the Journal Record Building, which formerly housed the offices of the Journal Record. It now houses the Oklahoma City National Memorial Museum, which features numerous exhibits and artifacts related to the Oklahoma City bombing. Staff of the National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism, a non-partisan think tank created shortly after the bombing by family members and survivors, also work here to spread knowledge of terrorism and its prevention.

Oklahoma City

Journal Record Building - Now Oklahoma City National Memorial Museum

Oklahoma City

A Team 5 Rescue Worker originally painted the message on this wall during search and recovery efforts in April 1995. The building on which it is painted was a functioning office building when the bomb exploded across the street. Ceilings collapsed, walls fell in and glass shards flew throughout the building. Hundreds of people were injured, many critically. Fortunately, no one was killed inside this building.

 

Ride To Remember

8th annual Memorial Motorcycle Run
April 18, 2015

Although a terrible thing happened in 1995, we have all vowed to Never Forget and honor those who give their all.

The Oklahoma Memorial Run, a Ride to Remember, began 8 years ago as a way for riders across the county to remember the lives lost and those effected by the horrific Oklahoma City Murrah Building bombing April 19th, 1995. As a bonded community, riders, friends and sponsors come together to raise money to help maintain the Oklahoma City National Memorial Museum.

Oklahoma City

Ride To Remember - 8th annual Memorial Motorcycle Run

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma's Governor Mary Fallin with Jim Dillon

Oklahoma City

Gathering by the Reflecting Pool and the Gates of time.

Oklahoma City

Ride To Remember by the Memorial Fence

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma's Governor Mary Fallin with Jim Dillon

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma's Governor Mary Fallin

 

Sources:
Photos by Dillon Foundation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oklahoma_City_National_Memorial
http://okcridetoremember.com/
https://www.facebook.com/events/1770760689815853/

 

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